Recent Changes

Monday, February 11

  1. page Citing Your Sources edited ... Mazer, Harry. The Last Mission. New York: Delacorte Press, 1979. An article from a library re…
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    Mazer, Harry. The Last Mission. New York: Delacorte Press, 1979.
    An article from a library research database:
    ...
    About Profiling.." New Yorker 6 Feb. 2006:38-43. SIRS Knowledge
    A website:
    Moulton, Jim. "Dealing With Plagiaroism: Proactive, or Punitive?" Edutopia. 12 January 2008.
    <http://www.edutopia.org/community/spiralnotebook>.<http://www.edutopia.org/community/spiralnotebook>.6
    Note: There are many different types of sources: these are only three. We highly recommend that you use one of the following websites to create your citations, as there are so many variations. Be sure on each site to read the instructions. For instance, you will have to alphabetize your list and you will have to format the list with hanging indents.
    The MLA Guide in our library has complete instructions and many examples.
    (view changes)
    11:18 am
  2. page space.menu edited ... Avoiding Plagiarism Citing Your Sources Finding Source Material Sources
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    Avoiding Plagiarism
    Citing Your Sources
    Finding Source MaterialSources
    (view changes)
    11:10 am
  3. page Citing Your Sources edited Citing Your Sources ... Here are two samples of ... create your citations. citations, if …

    Citing Your Sources
    ...
    Here are two samples of
    ...
    create your citations.citations, if your teacher allows you to use these.
    Book by a single author:
    Mazer, Harry. The Last Mission. New York: Delacorte Press, 1979.
    ...
    Moulton, Jim. "Dealing With Plagiaroism: Proactive, or Punitive?" Edutopia. 12 January 2008.
    <http://www.edutopia.org/community/spiralnotebook>.
    ...
    with hanging indents, of the site doesn't do it:
    You can also look at the
    indents.
    The
    MLA Guide
    ...
    our library forhas complete instructions and many examples.
    http://citationmachine.net
    http://easybib.com
    (view changes)
    10:41 am
  4. page Citing Your Sources edited ... Book by a single author: Mazer, Harry. The Last Mission. New York: Delacorte Press, 1979. A…
    ...
    Book by a single author:
    Mazer, Harry. The Last Mission. New York: Delacorte Press, 1979.
    An article from a library research database:
    Gladwell, Malcolm. "Troublemakers: What Pitbulls Can Teach Us About Profiling.." SIRS Knowledge Source. Christ School Library, Arden, NC. 11 Feb. 2008 <http://sks.sirs.com>

    A website:
    Moulton, Jim. "Dealing With Plagiaroism: Proactive, or Punitive?" Edutopia. 12 January 2008.
    http://www.edutopia.org/community/spiralnotebook.
    We
    <http://www.edutopia.org/community/spiralnotebook>.
    Note: There are many different types of sources: these are only three. We
    highly recommend
    ...
    do it:
    You can also look at the MLA Guide in our library for instructions and examples.

    http://citationmachine.net
    http://easybib.com
    (view changes)
    10:38 am
  5. page home edited ... Read and take notes, and be sure to save information for "Works Cited." Write your …
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    Read and take notes, and be sure to save information for "Works Cited."
    Write your paper/project.
    ...
    carefully. Prepare liustlist of Works
    Evaluate your product.
    Step 1: Choose your topic.Once you have a topic chosen, read enough about it it frame the specific question or problem you will be addressing. You are not just "writing about [topic x]." You are making an argument (a thesis statement) or posing a question to be investigated.
    (view changes)
    10:15 am

Wednesday, February 6

  1. 10:40 am
  2. page Sources edited ... {computer_thumb.png} {book_thumb.png} Sources in Your Library Books and Films: ... be irr…
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    {computer_thumb.png} {book_thumb.png} Sources in Your Library
    Books and Films:
    ...
    be irrelevant. If you don't find anything, try a more general topic: "architecture" instead of "Doric columns," "dogs" instead of "Rottweilers."
    Magazines and Newspapers: You can browse the covers and table of contents of magazines and browse through the relevant newspaper sections. Some of the publications have websites where you can search for articles. Also, the SIRS Knowledge Source is a good place to search, as many of these publications are in there. But sometimes you'll just have to browse.
    To Find Good Internet Sources: (Passwords available in library)
    ...
    An archive of news items, photos, transcripts and other primary sources covering over a hundred years of history.
    NetTrekker http://school.nettrekker.com
    ...
    on-campus access. For off-campus, ask for passwords.
    Nettrekker is an education search engine that finds excellent websites for research. This will bring you MUCH better results than Google, as all the sites have been selected by educators.
    (view changes)
    10:39 am
  3. page home edited ... Evaluate your product. Step 1: Choose your topic.Once you have a topic chosen, read enough ab…
    ...
    Evaluate your product.
    Step 1: Choose your topic.Once you have a topic chosen, read enough about it it frame the specific question or problem you will be addressing. You are not just "writing about [topic x]." You are making an argument (a thesis statement) or posing a question to be investigated.
    ...
    appropriate materials. Here
    Here
    is a
    ...
    available to you.you from the Internet:
    Questions to ask about a source:
    Is it authoritative? Can you trust it? Books , magazines, and newspapers are usually trustworthy. Websites need to be examined closely.
    Is it relevant to your research?
    Is it on a useful level for you to understand?
    Is the information timely (not too old, if that matters)?
    Clues to authority: Domains that are .org, .edu, .gov, . net are USUALLY reliable. (But beware -- see the example of the MLK site.) .com sites can be good if they are from a reputable source, like a reference database or the History Channel, for example.
    The domain type is a clue to reliability. Generally, .org or .edu sites are impartial, though .edu sites may give you a schoolchild's work, so watch out! Government and military sites have their own domains and should be considered if the information is relevant.. Commercial sites (.com) can be good if the organization is known and respected (like The History Channel).
    (view changes)
    10:35 am
  4. page home edited ... Steps to a Good Research Project Choose your topic and then define the problem or question yo…
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    Steps to a Good Research Project
    Choose your topic and then define the problem or question you are addressing.
    Find good source materials
    Read and take notes, and be sure to save information for "Works Cited."
    Write your paper/project.
    ...
    Step 1: Choose your topic.Once you have a topic chosen, read enough about it it frame the specific question or problem you will be addressing. You are not just "writing about [topic x]." You are making an argument (a thesis statement) or posing a question to be investigated.
    Step 2: Find good sources. Using your library and the Internet, find appropriate materials. Here is a link to excellent sources available to you.
    Sources should be relevant, authoritative, and timely. Check with your teacherQuestions to see which kinds of sources are appropriate.ask about a source:
    Is it authoritative? Can you trust it?
    Books , magazines, and journalsnewspapers are generally reliable, as they are edited and reviewed before publication. Research databases carefully select their material and canusually trustworthy. Websites need to be trusted.In the case of the "free web", anyone can publish, soexamined closely.
    Is it relevant to your research?
    Is it on a useful level for
    you need to look atunderstand?
    Clues to authority: Domains that are .org, .edu, .gov, . net are USUALLY reliable. (But beware -- see
    the sourceexample of the webpage: is it scholarly? is itMLK site.) .com sites can be good if they are from a respected organization? Isreputable source, like a reference database or the information timely? Is it verifiable?Does the source have a bias?History Channel, for example.
    The domain type is a clue to reliability. Generally, .org or .edu sites are impartial, though .edu sites may give you a schoolchild's work, so watch out! Government and military sites have their own domains and should be considered if the information is relevant.. Commercial sites (.com) can be good if the organization is known and respected (like The History Channel).
    Step 3: Read and take notes. Reading and note-taking: how to use your source material.
    (view changes)
    7:25 am

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